Comments for SMB IT Journal https://smbitjournal.com The Information Technology Resource for Small Business Fri, 01 Feb 2019 20:52:45 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.1.1 Comment on Understanding the Western Digital SATA Drive Lineup (2014) by Jim Millard https://smbitjournal.com/2014/05/understanding-the-western-digital-sata-drive-lineup-2014/comment-page-1/#comment-36714 Fri, 01 Feb 2019 20:52:45 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=570#comment-36714 It’s been a moment; I’d love to see an updated version for 2019, given all the changes they’ve undergone.

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Comment on The Jurassic Park Effect by Shane https://smbitjournal.com/2015/07/the-jurassic-park-effect/comment-page-1/#comment-36594 Thu, 17 Jan 2019 15:59:57 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=777#comment-36594 I appreciate the article and understand what you are saying. I do have file servers on real operating systems at present. However, I have a case in which I simply need two chunks of simple storage and less time getting them running.

I have a backup software that runs throughout the day getting delta block snapshots and I having lost a CentOS 7 RAID 5 and then RAID6 as the storage had thought of throwing a NAS device at two locations connected by fiber and putting the backup software on a third machine so it writes to both in a redundant fashion. The only purpose of these two boxes would be storage space for this one backup system and time saved of getting things up and running. In this scenario, where it is not a filesystem and not the only backup strategy in place, would you recommend 2 hardware NAS boxes for simply saving time?

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Comment on The Cult of ZFS by ZFS won’t save you: fancy filesystem fanatics need to get a clue about bit rot (and RAID-5) – Jody Bruchon https://smbitjournal.com/2014/05/the-cult-of-zfs/comment-page-1/#comment-35969 Wed, 21 Nov 2018 05:02:10 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=565#comment-35969 […] the author of this post is incompetent],” would you please feel free to tell that to all the people that say “CRC” when discussing ZFS? Language is made to communicate things and if I […]

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Comment on Doing IT at Home: Enterprise Networking by Scott Alan Miller https://smbitjournal.com/2014/05/doing-it-at-home-enterprise-networking/comment-page-1/#comment-35197 Thu, 04 Oct 2018 20:26:52 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=591#comment-35197 True, everyone has their own style of learning. Although needing to learn from a teacher creates a major barrier to IT learners as IT is a continuous learning profession. So needing a teacher, needing to be able to ask questions of someone in person are a major risk to someone in the field or an employer. Most employers need employees who are specifically of the “self motivated & can teach themselves” types. It’s rare for someone to be able to be successful in IT and lack that aptitude. IT specifically, more than nearly any other field, expects or even demands that professionals teach themselves continuously throughout their entire careers.

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Comment on Doing IT at Home: Enterprise Networking by Ata Ul Naseer https://smbitjournal.com/2014/05/doing-it-at-home-enterprise-networking/comment-page-1/#comment-35195 Thu, 04 Oct 2018 16:53:54 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=591#comment-35195 Also, what style of learning suits you best? Do you learn better in-person with guidance from a teacher? Someone you can ask questions and get customized responses from? Or are you more of a self-starter who can seek out the answers you need online? Can you motivate yourself, or do you need some external push to get you to learn?

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Comment on When No Redundancy Is More Reliable – The Myth of Redundancy by Scott Alan Miller https://smbitjournal.com/2012/05/when-no-redundancy-is-more-reliable/comment-page-1/#comment-34800 Fri, 31 Aug 2018 04:45:52 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=257#comment-34800 @andrew Actually I think you’ll find that you have the premise backwards. My entire point was that since R0 requires one fewer drives, it is less likely (for the same capacity and performance) to experience a drive failure, at all. So rather than being focused on what happens after a failure like you thought, the entire point I was making here was the opposite, that you have to stop dealing only with that one portion of the risk and look at the risk as a whole. You can’t overlook the trigger to the rebuild and only look at the rebuild, you have to look at the full risk scenario. Just run the math, it’s that simple.

And yes, I thought that I did show exactly what you are stating that I should show… that by having R5 you clearly increase the risk of the initial failure, by a lot. That’s the fundamental premise here. I’m not sure how you missed that, as that was the entire basis of the article.

R5 requires N+1 disks compared to the N disks of RAID 0. That gives equal capacity and a rather significant performance advantage to R0 under most performance scenarios. So the R0 has one fewer disk to fail. That is generally pretty statistically significant in any real world sized array.

That’s before we take into account, and allows us to ignore, the accepted industry knowledge that R5 increases wear and tear causing each individual drive to be more likely to experience failure as well. This is caused slightly from increased wear and tear during reads, but almost entirely by the effects of the 4x write expansion. The drives are read more often and written dramatically more often than its R0 counterpart. Often 200 – 400% more. That’s a big number for wear and tear.

So take the incredibly obvious increased initial risk of having more moving parts to fail. Then work them drastically harder under the same workload and you’ve got a super clear picture of why the R5 array, apples to apples, suffers initial drive failure more often than the R0 array.

Now that we’ve established why R5s need to recover more often, then when we talk about how reliably R5 rebuild operations are, we have a clear understanding that this must be significantly reliable enough to overcome the additional risk posed by the increased initial failures that they cause.

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Comment on The Smallest IT Department by Mardell Lauterborn https://smbitjournal.com/2013/02/the-smallest-it-department/comment-page-1/#comment-34356 Sun, 12 Aug 2018 20:01:54 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=464#comment-34356 The Smallest IT Department | SMB IT Journal

[…]The white part of the stalk at the bottom, and the new shoots, may be eaten raw or labored.[…]

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Comment on The Smallest IT Department by Nerd Journey 003: Work/Life Balance and Hero Worship – Nerd Journey https://smbitjournal.com/2013/02/the-smallest-it-department/comment-page-1/#comment-34268 Tue, 07 Aug 2018 11:00:56 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=464#comment-34268 […] See Scott Alan Miller’s article The Smallest IT Department. […]

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Comment on Project Management of the RMS Titanic and the Olympic Ships by Mercedez Vanwechel https://smbitjournal.com/2008/02/project-management-of-the-rms-titanic-and-the-olympic-ships/comment-page-1/#comment-32539 Mon, 30 Apr 2018 02:05:04 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=1102#comment-32539 Project Management of the RMS Titanic and the Olympic Ships | SMB IT Journal

[…]Corporations are prohibited from indemnifying their directors within the event of their insolvency.[…]

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Comment on Types of IT Service Providers by Libbie Furci https://smbitjournal.com/2015/09/types-of-it-service-providers/comment-page-1/#comment-32495 Sun, 29 Apr 2018 03:09:24 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=780#comment-32495 Types of IT Service Providers | SMB IT Journal

[…]Because the owner you make the final call on all business choices.[…]

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Comment on When No Redundancy Is More Reliable – The Myth of Redundancy by Andrew https://smbitjournal.com/2012/05/when-no-redundancy-is-more-reliable/comment-page-1/#comment-32266 Fri, 20 Apr 2018 10:58:28 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=257#comment-32266 I’m sorry but your whole conjecture is ridiculous. I know this is an old post but in the case that someone stumbles across it again (like I have), I need to have a say here to correct some serious inaccuracies.

Firstly, though, I will say that the general message is definitely valid – as re-iterated by even the non-IT guy:
“I do entirely agree with the position of not relying on half-baked redundancy ideas for long-term data maintenance and those who do deserve the consequences.”

To the point in question, however.

You want to argue that R5 is –less– resilient than R0. But your whole case is based on what happens –AFTER– the first drive failure. Now, no matter –what– the chances of the R5 successfully rebuilding are, there is a still –SOME– chance. Whereas with R0, your data is already gone, 100%, with the first drive loss.

The only way that R5 could be -less- resilient than R0, is if you could show that the very fact of creating an array with write+parity write operations statistically increases the risk of an –initial– drive failure, such that the chance of the initial failure AND that of the secondary URE during a rebuild, together, increases past the likelihood of single disk failure in a R0. And this is clearly never going to be the case. Well, not unless some ridiculously poorly-written RAID contoller software does some stupid/insane activity with the disks while in the array.

As for all these reports that “no-one uses R5 anymore”, etc. I have and still do work in IT with server arrays, etc. That is not the point though – unless you work with –every– single company, no-one here is qualified to say what “everyone” or ‘most’ companies/engineers are doing “these days” and it makes 0 sense to claim it.

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Comment on Choosing a RAID Level by Drive Count by Enterprise Guy https://smbitjournal.com/2012/11/choosing-a-raid-level-by-drive-count/comment-page-1/#comment-32127 Fri, 13 Apr 2018 14:48:38 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=380#comment-32127 The primary differentiator when choosing between raid 5 and raid 6 isn’t how many drives you have, but the size of those drives and the rebuild time. When you’re talking 6TB SATA drives that can take days to rebuild, you need raid 6 so that you’re not unprotected during the rebuild, and also to protect you against unrecoverable read errors in large disks. If you have small fast FC drives, raid 5 is fine. Big slow SATA needs raid 6.

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Comment on Titanic Project Management & Comparison with Software Projects by Karri Macknight https://smbitjournal.com/2017/02/titanic-project-management-comparison-with-software-projects/comment-page-1/#comment-32004 Sun, 08 Apr 2018 14:17:06 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=1051#comment-32004 Titanic Project Management

[…]No matter what your want, when remodeling your bathroom, the sky is now the limit.[…]

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Comment on Why We Reboot Servers by Scott Alan Miller https://smbitjournal.com/2011/02/why-we-reboot-servers/comment-page-1/#comment-31483 Tue, 13 Mar 2018 20:15:52 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=140#comment-31483 James, I don’t think that your comment reflects what was in the article. We reboot so that we “know the state” of a machine, not because the application needs it. This is not related to computers resting, it is validating the correctness of the program. It’s not trusting programs simply be correct, it’s ensuring that they are and doing so at appropriate (planned) times rather than simply trusting that they are and finding out when we least expect it.

Rebooting as recommended here and any enterprise environment I’ve seen, is specifically to look for things being broken.

We can’t operate simply believing all software is perfect and will always remain perfect. We, as IT, can’t turn a blind eye to software bugs, errors, omissions and interactions. We’d be reckless to introduce more and more changes over time, without an ability to ensure that those changes work, or work together. And the more we do, the more we have to be able to back those systems out.

The entire modern world of DevOps and Cloud Computing is based on the ability to spin up and spin down, reboot at will.

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Comment on Why We Reboot Servers by James Frederics https://smbitjournal.com/2011/02/why-we-reboot-servers/comment-page-1/#comment-30948 Sun, 04 Feb 2018 17:19:16 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=140#comment-30948 This mindset throws away the concept of program correctness. Rebooting for updates and patches is one thing, but rebooting because “we need X program to stay running” is just subsidizing someone else’s awful program design.

Computers don’t need a rest. If you have to reboot because otherwise something quits, points to that something being broken.

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Comment on Choosing a Storage Type by geoff https://smbitjournal.com/2012/08/choosing-a-storage-type/comment-page-1/#comment-30914 Thu, 01 Feb 2018 11:06:49 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=328#comment-30914 Really helpful and great as a primer for general IT and Tech interested staff thanks Scott

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Comment on On DevOps and Snowflakes by Cardiologist https://smbitjournal.com/2015/01/on-devops-and-snowflakes/comment-page-1/#comment-30614 Fri, 12 Jan 2018 10:28:18 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=687#comment-30614 The discussion started with, First we must talk about what we mean by DevOps I like this explanation on DevOps.

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Comment on The Jurassic Park Effect by Steven https://smbitjournal.com/2015/07/the-jurassic-park-effect/comment-page-1/#comment-30021 Tue, 14 Nov 2017 16:16:06 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=777#comment-30021 Thanks for sharing those thoughts. Now I suddenly understand why I’m always doubtfull about picking the right solution to “solve a problem” or fullfill this kind of “needs”.

Even with a NAS solution bought from a vendor (like Qnap, Netgear, Synology) I’m always wondering the “what if the hardware breaks down, disks still readable in newer hardware”?

For that reason I also looked into FreeNAS and others, but still doubting about those solutions. This article surtenly makes me think about this again and might get me to go an entirely other direction (FreeBSD for example).

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Comment on Doing IT at Home: Enterprise Networking by Rob Burton https://smbitjournal.com/2014/05/doing-it-at-home-enterprise-networking/comment-page-1/#comment-29921 Mon, 30 Oct 2017 10:23:56 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=591#comment-29921 Thanks for the great article on home networking. I’d also add that log management becomes important when building a network, to maintain the security and stability of it. With NXLog you can do it for free, since it is a centralized log management tool that is open source, hence available for free of charge ( check here: https://nxlog.co/products/nxlog-community-edition ). NXLog is really powerful when it comes to log management, since it provides high-performance, and does it even when scaling to thousands of servers. And it can collect logs from many OS, like Windows, Linux, Android, etc. It really worth to take a look at, when building your own home or company network.

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Comment on Replicated Local Storage by Shamil https://smbitjournal.com/2013/07/replicated-local-storage/comment-page-1/#comment-29888 Wed, 25 Oct 2017 16:32:49 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=515#comment-29888 Very helpful.. thanks alot for sharing knowledge.

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Comment on The Smallest IT Department by Neil Garner https://smbitjournal.com/2013/02/the-smallest-it-department/comment-page-1/#comment-29589 Fri, 06 Oct 2017 07:04:14 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=464#comment-29589 Really great article describing my current position running a 1 man band IT services company perfectly.
I never regret going down this route though despite the challenges you so eloquently describe. Still preferable for me compared to being a mainstream employee.

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Comment on Hot Spare or a Hot Mess by Ammaross Danan https://smbitjournal.com/2012/07/hot-spare-or-a-hot-mess/comment-page-1/#comment-29347 Fri, 15 Sep 2017 17:36:33 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=308#comment-29347 Not to necro the article or anything but things to consider that were not mentioned in the article:

1) In RAID10, if a bitrot incident occurs during the rebuild of a bad disk, you get silent corruption. If a URE or bad block occurs, you either get corruption or a failed array. This is less likely since it’s a 1:1 copy instead of many-to-1, but something to be aware of.
2) RAID5/6 will detect both of those cases and treat it as a corrupt block. RAID6 can correct it with the double parity (quorum consensus) whereas RAID5 doesn’t know if the stripe data or the stripe parity is correct; just that one of them is wrong. Usually this throws an error or silently replaces the parity data with updated (possibly bad) parity information.
3) These considerations are precisely why a resilient filesystem on top of RAID is beneficial. ZFS, BtrFS, etc will do block-level checksums on data to detect these types of pass-thru errors and correct them. Since they’re software RAID filesystems, they can use their many error-correcting algorithms in tandem, so it would know precisely which block on which disk had a URE, bitrot, bad block, etc and correct it appropriately. ZFS RAID5/6 also has the benefit of not immediately ejecting a failing (not failed! failing) drive that has bad blocks, UREs, etc so it can 1:1 copy the drive during resilvering, thus keeping the exact benefit Scott Alan Miller mentions that RAID10 has in regards to resilver UREs and stress. However, ZFS is an enterprise software RAID and filesystem combined and is far more advanced than simple hardware RAID 99% of this article is referring to, and sadly, what most internet rule-of-thumb guidance refers to.
4) That said, RAID10 is performance. RAID6 is archival. This doesn’t mean RAID6 has bad performance, just slower (sometimes by far in cases) than RAID10. In an enterprise SAN, RAID5 isn’t uncommon, but there’s many higher-level things going on that make it safe(r) to do than a DAS card from Dell or HP, so you can’t use that as an example.
5) Warm Spares are useful for SANs, where you have 100+ drives spread across many RAID arrays and you have one or two warm spares to jump in and rebuild until the NOC techs can swap it out. This is primarily a cost-saving measure due to shelf realestate and if the SAN was engineered well enough, is resilient to even losing an entire shelf of disks, so “offlining a RAID5 due to URE” isn’t an issue either. Most enterprise SANs use software RAID anyway, similar to things like ZFS, so it’s difficult to even draw exact RAID comparisons in the first place.

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Comment on Hot Spare or a Hot Mess by Raffles https://smbitjournal.com/2012/07/hot-spare-or-a-hot-mess/comment-page-1/#comment-29274 Wed, 06 Sep 2017 13:47:24 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=308#comment-29274 Thanks for the article and the explanations. I really like your ZIP file analogy for RAID 5/6 – that’s exactly it isn’t it? The redundancy is obtained by using error correction, which relies on EVERY other bit of the information being there, so that it can calculate what is missing. It’s amazing how it manages to get dual redundancy (or triple redundancy for RAID 6) without doubling (or tripling) the amount of disk space it uses. Almost magic having an entire second copy of the disk in a fraction of the space, but a bit fragile. As it turns out, we have gone RAID 6. Why? Well firstly, sometimes you just have some kit to work with, and a spec to meet. We need to get a certain amount of actual storage from a 20 disk storage array, and we also need to provide a certain level of redundancy. RAID 10 wouldn’t leave us with enough storage unfortunately. We have no warm spare for the reasons you mentioned – we would rather replace a failed disk manually at a time of our choosing. Instead we have gone for a dynamic disk pool solution, which means we can use all the disks we have available to maximise both our storage capacity and also redundancy (the DDP rebalancing of the RAID 6 means we can have several disks failing, not just 2, provided they don’t all go down simultaneously).

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Comment on Doing IT at Home: The Home PBX by bomberosmaipu https://smbitjournal.com/2013/08/doing-it-at-home-the-home-pbx/comment-page-1/#comment-29166 Thu, 31 Aug 2017 21:56:13 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=535#comment-29166 I’d vote for utilizing voicemail to e-mail exclusively on a home PBX as well and not store the voicemails on the PBX, but to each his own.

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Comment on The Cult of ZFS by ZFS won’t save you: fancy filesystem fanatics need to get a clue about bit rot (and RAID-5) | Random musings from a hazardous computer business owner https://smbitjournal.com/2014/05/the-cult-of-zfs/comment-page-1/#comment-28851 Thu, 10 Aug 2017 03:55:45 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=565#comment-28851 […] the author of this post is incompetent],” would you please feel free to tell that to all the people that say “CRC” when discussing ZFS? Language is made to communicate things and if I […]

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Comment on Hot Spare or a Hot Mess by mysteryDave https://smbitjournal.com/2012/07/hot-spare-or-a-hot-mess/comment-page-1/#comment-28628 Wed, 19 Jul 2017 13:24:47 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=308#comment-28628 One of the better reasoned and written articles I have seen on here. Excellent.

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Comment on Hardware and Software RAID by mysteryDave https://smbitjournal.com/2012/11/hardware-and-software-raid/comment-page-1/#comment-28627 Wed, 19 Jul 2017 12:49:40 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=375#comment-28627 You didn’t mention tolerance of hardware faults. With a hardware raid should your raid controller fail you will need to be able to replace it with an identical one to recover your data. With software raid, running an identical O/S (or file system, or RAID software version) is relatively easy and keeping spare copies of software inexpensive. Sourcing an identical hardware RAID controller from when the array was setup maybe several years ago can be difficult and expensive.

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Comment on The Risks of Licensing by Jason Moore https://smbitjournal.com/2017/07/the-risks-of-licensing/comment-page-1/#comment-28620 Tue, 18 Jul 2017 18:29:36 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=1239#comment-28620 Some very good points here. It pays to be organized and have someone or a group that is capable and providing oversight for each other to handle this. I am not sure how everyone keeps track of licensing but I know there are software solutions for this as well as vendors that will do it for you. Not sure how much I would trust a vendor though but I guess that is another topic. Your route to keeping all this straight would no doubt also depend on how large an organization you are. At home I use OneNote extensively and set up calendar reminders for the few licenses that I have but I do at least know this is a makeshift solution. My consequences are less though than a large business whose servers depend on active licenses.

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Comment on Hot Spare or a Hot Mess by Craig Jacobs https://smbitjournal.com/2012/07/hot-spare-or-a-hot-mess/comment-page-1/#comment-28600 Sat, 15 Jul 2017 22:53:17 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=308#comment-28600 I was initially skeptical of the article becasue of the title, but I found your logic to be unassailable.

I almost always choose RAID 10 + HS (WS) becasue the NAS units I use have 5 bays, and disks are cheap, and the empty bay irritates my OCD nature. RAID 10 is far faster and I’ve noticed, although this may be my imagination, that the disk chatter noise from the units is less than with RAID 6.

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Comment on If It Ain’t Broke, Don’t Fix It by Jason Moore https://smbitjournal.com/2017/07/if-it-aint-broke-dont-fix-it/comment-page-1/#comment-28556 Tue, 11 Jul 2017 19:20:54 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=1238#comment-28556 Seems to be a typo- end of 4th paragraph – Must like a car, but dramatically moreso.

Good article. I see your point and it is hard to argue with it. All systems need maintenance and that is not the same as tearing it apart to see the makeup of the insides. There is value to that but of course not in production systems.

However, it is strange to see how many people associate maintenance with (fixing it when it isn’t broken). They are 2 entirely different things. So your absolutely right in many IT circles and especially the users who associate those 2 things together.

For example would we leave our databases unoptimized after years of use or our backup data undeduplicated when we know it needs it? Of course not. Subsequently that is just good maintenance.

Properly maintained systems are crucial in IT just like your car, house, or your land. Maintaining what you have is really just caring about what you have.

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Comment on The Social Contract of Sales by Jason Moore https://smbitjournal.com/2017/07/the-social-contract-of-sales/comment-page-1/#comment-28504 Mon, 03 Jul 2017 14:39:55 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=1224#comment-28504 Sir i enjoyed this article a lot. I thought your bear analogy was hilarious btw. I do believe the point that I came away with as being the most important is in your last paragraph where you said sales people will let us lie to ourselves all we want to. I think that is just too true. Sure it is obvious when your some distance away from the situation but we often all need to be reminded of that in our meetings and buying process. Good post.

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Comment on Virtualize Domain Controllers by Jason Moore https://smbitjournal.com/2017/06/virtualize-domain-controllers/comment-page-1/#comment-28399 Mon, 26 Jun 2017 16:19:10 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=1221#comment-28399 I think this statement of your says it all:

“Oddly, people seem to go out regularly seeking clarification on this one particular workload, however and if you seek bad advice, someone is sure to provide. ”

I guess the only reason advice like this is given out is that a few people do not understand what the role of virtualizing your assets are.

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Comment on IT’s Most Needed Skills by Jason Moore https://smbitjournal.com/2017/04/its-most-needed-skills/comment-page-1/#comment-28284 Mon, 19 Jun 2017 19:59:34 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=193#comment-28284 Oh yes excellent point Flensing. People do that to me also. Next time I should tell them it will be about 6 hours to install and configure everything Adobe has and see their expressions then.

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Comment on When a Backup Is Not A Backup by Jason Moore https://smbitjournal.com/2017/06/when-a-backup-is-not-a-backup/comment-page-1/#comment-28283 Mon, 19 Jun 2017 19:56:17 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=244#comment-28283 That’s a good point and an easy misconception to have about backups. It does seem obvious that a backup would include at least 2 copies but I can see how a lack of communication in this area would put data at risk.

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Comment on IT’s Most Needed Skills by Flensing Knife https://smbitjournal.com/2017/04/its-most-needed-skills/comment-page-1/#comment-28279 Mon, 19 Jun 2017 01:46:06 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=193#comment-28279 My personal pet peeve is when someone says they need “Adobe” installed on their computer.

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Comment on Why We Reboot Servers by Flensing Knife https://smbitjournal.com/2011/02/why-we-reboot-servers/comment-page-1/#comment-28278 Mon, 19 Jun 2017 01:43:11 +0000 http://www.smbitjournal.com/?p=140#comment-28278 Yep, exactly right. The same argument can also be applied to workstation rebooting. Macintosh users are particularly susceptible to the “It’s not Windows, I don’t have to reboot” syndrome.

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